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Sullivan Library at WDMS: Grade 8 Research Guides

 

Grade 8 English
Argumentative Analysis Research Guide

Get organized with a research planner.
Make a digital copy & save to Drive:

RESEARCH PLANNER

for iPads: Research Planner

DEVELOP YOUR KEYWORDS

IMPROVE YOUR SEARCH RESULTS: 
Use Multiple Keywords!

1. Start with the obvious keyword(s) in your topic
2. Then try synonyms of your original keyword(s)
3. Finally, be aware of other keywords/terms found in your search results

Need help getting started?
Watch a video (below) & download a worksheet.

TOPIC FINDER

How Topic Finder Works
(video below)

InfoTrac - Topic Finder

SEARCH FOLLETT DESTINY

CART Your WEBSITES

GOOGLE OPTIONS: SCHOLAR, ADVANCED, BASIC

GOOGLE SEARCH TRICKS

FAKE NEWS: HOW TO SPOT IT

1. Consider the source.

Investigate the site, its mission, the contact info (CART the website!)

2. Check the author.

Do a search for the author, the editor, the sponsoring organization. Does she/he/it really exist?

3. Check the date.

Is there a copyright date on the page? When was the article actually published?

4. Check your own biases.

Does your opinion of the topic affect how you think about this information?

5. Read beyond.

Read more than just the headline - does the whole page make sense?

6. Supporting sources. 

Are links provided and do they support the author's claim?

7. Is it a joke?

Could this information be satirical, intended as a joke?

8. Ask the experts.

Check with your teacher, librarian, or one of these fact-checking sites:

Snopes.com
FactCheck.org
PolitiFact.com
Washington Post fact-checker


 

DATABASES by SUBJECT

MORE RECOMMENDED DATABASES

ESTABLISHING CREDIBILITY ONLINE

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Credible Source?

HOW CAN YOU TELL?
3 Strategies:

  1. Read Laterally
    • Open a new tab
    • Google the name of the website's organization, editor, author
  2. Investigate "About Us" links
  3. Don't settle for Google's top 5 results
    • Dig deeper into your search results
    • Check out the sources listed on a page 

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Ask yourself these questions:

  • Does the web site provide references for further research that can be independently verified?
  • Are authors identified, and their affiliations, credentials, and contact information provided?
  • Who owns or is responsible for the web site?
  • Does the site describe its mission and are staff members identified?
  • Does the site carry advertising?
  • If so, are the ads related to the content on the page?
  • If the site is not-for-profit, are its sources of funding identified?

More tips from
Georgetown University

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